Virus-fungus combo killing honeybees

John Clark's picture

I found this story on line thought you all should read it. This is the link.

http://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2010/10/06/Virus-fungus-combo-killing-honeybees/UPI-70031286419509/

"A combination of a virus and a fungus could be responsible for colony collapse disorder, the mysterious syndrome killing U.S. honeybees, researchers say..."

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Extractor Available for Loan

ralph's picture

The West Virginia Beekeepers Association has made a nine frame electric extrtactor available to our club members for their use. It comes with filtering pails, an electric decapping knife, and collecting pails. It is available to you at no charge. The unit is very nice and will make quick work of your extracting process. Anyone interested, please call Steve at (304) 242-9867.

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Guttation And Your Bees

Daves Bees's picture

This is a most important topic to beekeepers. This first link from Wikipedia tells what guttation is: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guttation 

Pesticides in guttation water are quite probably the cause of CCD! Other countries have already suggested it. Perhaps a better name for CCD would be Constant Chemical Decimation.

Read what your fellow beekeepers in Atlanta posted.

Metro Atlanta Beekeepers Association

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Colony Collapse Disorder still a problem

ralph's picture

[img_assist|nid=28|title=|desc=|link=none|align=left|width=100|height=67]An article recently ran in the Houston Chronicle on Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). The article said that CCD is still on the rise and poses a very real threat to the beekeeping industry.

Here is a quote from the beginning of the article: "Dropping in droves, bees are still puzzling agriculturists. It is the fourth straight winter that more than a quarter of the existing honeybee population has disappeared. This year, however, the rate of loss hit its second-highest point since 2007-2008."

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Installing a new hive

ralph's picture

 Installing bee colonies from a package  

Here is how I install a package of bees into a hive. We will assume that the hive is assembled and ready for bees. We assume also that you have ans are wearing proper bee gear - i.e. long sleeve shirt, long pants, a bee veil and gloves. It is also handy to have a hive tool, a pair of small vice-grips, and a brush.

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Brushy Mountain Bee Farm order

ralph's picture

I just finished my order for everything I need for a complete hive. I looked through all of the catalogues that have been circulating at the recent meetings, and after comparing prices, etc., I finally decided to order everything through Brushy Mountain Bee Farm. One thing I liked about Brushy Mountain was that I could place the order online, although I had to go through the catalogue first and write down everything I wanted.

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